Can you patch your tire? Of course!

This hack only needs garbage material, it’s easy and it solves a very important problem that causes good tires to be thrown away. Sometimes due to impact with a sharp rock, most of the others due to aging, tires are destined to die young . But they don’t just die, the deteriorate like us, after awhile they are loosing tread and holes are starting to  appear on the sides. You can’t do anything about the tread, but you can do something about the holes. You can patch it, as you do with your inner tubes!

The technique is very simple and the end result can last for years.
It’s a very valuable hack to know if you are touring abroad and a hole in your tire is causing you problems!

You are going to need:

–  needlenose pliers

–   needle

–   thread

–  Trash can

trashed

Now, cover the hole with a folded in half piece of the trash can. The aluminum piece doesn’t have to have holes at this stage, you can make them while its on the tire with the needle . Use needlenose pliers to hold the needle for easier work. It should look like the picture 2. but with bigger piece of the can so it can cover more area around the hole.

1

Now put the tire and tube back on the wheel and you are ready to go!
IMPORTANT NOTE: Before putting the tire back in place, put a piece of innertube above your patch to protect your actual innertube from t’s sharp edges.

Alternative:

Mike in the comments mentioned that a piece of tire could be used as well instead of the aluminum can. An other reader, Michael varified this by sharing his experience using a recycled tire in a refugee camp  :

When we were still low on spare tyres in our refugee camps bicycle work shop last year, we used to use pieces of old tyres to patch some of the worst holes. We called it “GDR technique” because it was known to some of us from that time 🙂 It works without problems. Just use some plain profile tyre, You’ll need a considerably bigger piece than the metal patch you used here to make it sit tight inside. The inner tube adapts just fine to it and no stitching is needed..

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9 Comments Add yours

  1. bgddyjim says:

    The patch you have in the photo, while a great “get you home” hack, should never be used after you get home and can change the tire. With that big of a gash and belts obviously broken, that tire should be recycled. It’s too dangerous to ride on.

    1. Bicyclosis says:

      I am sorry Jim, but I disagree with you! I believe tires with patches like this are safe to ride! The two problems that arise when you have a hole in your tire are two: a) The exposed innertube will eventually break b) the ‘bump’ that is created by the innertube, if it gets big enough, will stuck on the brakes and will make a dangerous stop.

      Both of the above problems are solved with the patch.

      P.S. Ofcourse, if more and more holes are appearing on the tire, it should be recycled.

      1. bgddyjim says:

        No chance I’d trust my butt with a tire like that. To each his own. 😉

  2. Wow, this is a great little article! Are there any other ideas similar that you would like to share? I rarely press my tired to its limit and i think additions like this do extend the vitality of a tire. Should be fun to try this technique out next time my sidewall gets gashed.

    1. Bicyclosis says:

      Hello! I am glad you found it useful! I ‘ve done it before with leather and held up for months. With this method I believe will stay until the tire is too beat up to hold the innertube !

      If you go to the bottom of the front page you can choose category, press “Bike hacks” there and you will see many useful bike hack article I ‘ve shared in the past!

  3. Mike says:

    Pretty interesting trick to use a metal can to repair you tire.

    If you prepare for a trip, there might be a better alternative in recycling a part of an old tire. With this piece of can I think the edges can be sharp what can be a thread to the inner tube,

    1. Bicyclosis says:

      That’s true Mike, for that reasonI put a piece of innertube right on top of it before I place the actual innertube. When the innertube is pumped enough the inner tube piece will stay in place.

      I should add this step on the article. Good point.

      I’ve never used an old tire, I think the bulge of the innertube will push it out.

  4. Michael S says:

    When we were still low on spare tyres in our refugee camps bicycle work shop last year, we used to use pieces of old tyres to patch some of the worst holes. We called it “GDR technique” because it was known to some of us from that time 🙂 It works without problems. Just use some plain profile tyre, You’ll need a considerably bigger piece than the metal patch you used here to make it sit tight inside. The inner tube adapts just fine to it and no stitching is needed..

    1. Bicyclosis says:

      I was thinking that the bulge would push out the tire. So Mike was right above! I am going to add your comment in the article as an alternative!

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