How to easily repair your pitted hub cones!

What do you do when the cones of your wheel worn out (worn out = show signs of a pit/groove from the bearings resulting the hub to not spin smoothly)?  Your either replace the cones with new ones, or as many people do nowadays, buy a new wheel! The problem is, that cones are not that hard to pit, especially if if you ride often on a rough terrain or  if you ride a loaded bike. Few weeks ago, a friend of a friend gave me for free his expensive wheels, because he bought new ones after he noticed the worn out cone symptom (problematic wheel spinning)!

The factors that causes hub cones to pit are many, and although you can prolong their lives by maintaining them regularly, sooner or later you will have to buy new ones, or buy a new wheel! Before you do that, please continue reading!

Giannis‘ creative thinking found an easy and free solution by asking the radical question “why not repair them?”. He proved that this can be done with only a drill, a piece of sandpaper, a nail and a dremel  grinding bit. He even put the repaired cones to the test for a year (about 14.000 kms) and the cones seem to be holding up perfectly!

Here is how he did it:

First tighten the one end of the axle in the drill chuck
First tighten the one end of the axle in the drill chuck

 

And then tightens the cone onto the locknut in the other side of the axle
And then tighten the cone onto the locknut in the other side of the axle

 

The grinding stone bit smooths out the curve of the cone. (If you don't have this bit just go straight to the next step, it will still work, I believe).
The grinding stone bit smooths out the curve of the cone. (If you don’t have this bit just go straight to the next step, it will still work, I believe).

 

And then he wraps a nail with a piece of sandpaper (shouldn't be too rough) to make the cone curve smooth as a glass. The nail is used for the sandpaper to have a small curve and also to be easier to apply force on the right spot.
And then he wraps a nail with a piece of sandpaper (shouldn’t be too rough) to make the cone curve smooth as a glass. The nail is used for the sandpaper to have a small curve and also to be easier to apply force on the right spot.

 

 

Afte a year of hard riding and about 14.00 km the old cone looks as new!
After a year of hard riding and about 14.00 km the old cone looks as new!!!

 

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2 Comments Add yours

  1. Michael S says:

    Sounds really great! But wouldn’t you need to refurbish the opposite face as well? Does it all fit together then, balls and all?

    1. Bicyclosis says:

      Hello Michael,
      If the other cone is fine, you can leave it as it is. Yes, everything fit together again as before! Even if you ‘repair’ the cone few times (I doubt it will need an other repair for the next years), it will still fit perfectly in the hub.

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